Monday, February 27, 2017

Random Fact of the Day: Feminizations and Feminine Suffixes

English doesn't have any native feminizing suffixes: all the ones we typically use (-a, -ia, -ette/etta, -ine/ina) are borrowed from Latin and Latinate languages.
Rather, Old English had certain elements that were exclusively masculine or exclusively feminine (and many that could be either). It also usually depended on whether that element was the first half or the second half of the name--for instance, hild ("battle") could start either a boys' or girls' name (like Hildewine "battle-friend" or Hildegard "battle protection"), but as a ending element, it was pretty much exclusively for girls.

So instead, if you wanted to endemically turn an OE boys' name into a girls' name (whether or not that was something that even occurred to them, IDK), you would have to swap out the masculine ending element for a feminine one similar in sound or meaning, like Ælfwig ("elf war") to Ælfhild ("elf battle"); or Wulfwine ("wolf friend") to Wulfwynn ("wolf joy"); or in some cases, just reverse the elements: Burgstan ("fortress stone") to Stanburg ("stone fortress"); or Thrudgar ("strength spear") or Gertrude ("spear strength").


Of course, the whole "add an A to make a girls' name" thing was imported pretty darned early (by the 800s for sure, but possibly as early as the 200s AD), so this whole thing is really just an exercise in dorky minutiae. :p

Friday, February 24, 2017

RIP, 1970; Part 2

For this round, I'm looking at change in gender. As you can imagine, the vast majority that changed went boy-to-girl or boy-to-unisex.
I compared the gender ratio for each name in 1970 to the gender ratio today, and here are the biggest changes.
(from the current Top 1500, because names further down are a lot more subject to bouncing around)

Masculine in 1970, now more common for girls:
(note that this is not necessarily most-->least common today, but the names that changed gender most strongly)
  1. Charley
  2. Emory
  3. Riley
  4. Monroe
  5. Emerson
  6. Reese
  7. Emery
  8. Stevie
  9. Kennedy
  10. Addison
  11. Mckinley
  12. Palmer
  13. Ellery
  14. Leighton
  15. Payton
  16. Harley
  17. Bailey
  18. Aubrey
  19. Berkley
  20. Delaney
It's hard to show the change easily and succinctly, but Charley, the biggest gender-swap, went from 90 boys to every girl to 8 girls for every boy. Emory went from about 80 boys to every girl to 8 girls for every boy. I calculated using percentages, so these lists are weighted towards more common names--although Delaney went from 13 boys per girl to 277 girls per boy, it was much less popular to start with.

Still more common for boys, but with the biggest shifts toward unisex:
  1. Elliott
  2. Elliot
  3. Denver
  4. Spencer
  5. Drew
  6. Royal
  7. Milan
  8. Charlie
  9. Ellis
  10. Reece
  11. Jordan
  12. Blake
  13. Chandler
  14. Ari
  15. Remy
  16. Lennox
  17. Quincy
  18. Keegan
  19. Rory
  20. Dallas
Elliott was the biggest shift on any of the lists. It went from not appearing at all on the girls list (if there was one girl Elliott born in 1970, that would make it about a 230/1 boy/girl ratio) to a ratio of about 4 boys for every girl.

And just for fun, the few names that went girl-->boy (again, only from the 2015 boys' Top 1500 to avoid weird data).
More feminine in 1970, now more common for boys:
  1. Joan
  2. Yael
  3. Isa
  4. Tristin
  5. Dashawn
  6. Tristen
  7. Jean
  8. Dominique
  9. Elisha
  10. Davi
  11. Deshaun
  12. Niko
  13. Nico
  14. Nikola
  15. Arian
  16. Sami
  17. Deshawn
  18. Angel
Almost all of these were pretty uncommon for either in 1970 (for instance, Niko was given to 16 girls and 9 boys that year). Joan and Jean are big surprises, though! I knew they were generally considered "outdated" for girls, but I didn't realize both were now more common for boys (I'm assuming said the Catalan & French ways, respectively).

Still more common for girls, but with the biggest shifts toward unisex:
  1. Robin
  2. Eden
  3. Courtney
Of course, jumping from 1970 to 2015, you miss the giant spike of  Courtneys around 1990.
The one popular '70s name on this list is Robin--Robin was over 10x more common for girls in 1970, and is now nearly equal for boys and girls. Surprising, but pretty awesome!


If you're interested in the full list of gender-benders, it is here

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

RIP, 1970; Part 1.

To tide me over until the next SSA list release (Maaaaayyy....aaarrrrgggghh), I decided to have some fun seeing which names have died off since 1970.
(why 1970? It's kind of the borderline between the current parent and grandparent generations, plus apparently I haven't really done any sort of analysis with data from the 70s yet)

Aside from there being way more mistakes (I assume! I can't imagine there really were all that many guys named Mary, Patricia, or Lisa), I thought it'd be interesting to see which names/spellings that were in the Top 1500 in 1970 aren't on the 2015 list at all.
So for instance, Rob was #450 in 1970, given to 333 boys. In 2015, it was given to at most 4 boys; it doesn't appear anywhere on the complete 2015 list (the SSA only lists names given to 5 or more babies, for privacy).

Boys:
  • Rob, #450
  • Tod, #478
  • Robb, #514
  • Kraig, #557
  • Pat, #584
  • Lonny, #647
  • Brain, #693
  • Daryle, #696
  • Jefferey, #721
  • Kirt, #743
  • Timmothy, #829
  • Reginal, #841
  • Shanon, #856
  • Erie, #893
  • Burt, #916
  • Adolph, #927
  • Curtiss, #933
  • Dwane, #1000
  • Kieth, #1010
  • Roderic, #1011
  • Vern, #1012
  • Geoff, #1036
  • Brooke, #1052
  • Randel, #1058
  • Winfred, #1089
  • Sal, #1098
  • Kiley, #1106
  • Buford, #1130
  • Dick, #1145
  • Jemal, #1149
  • Lupe, #1152
  • Graig, #1160
  • Tadd, #1167
  • Tyronne, #1169
  • Gaylon, #1173
  • Kennth, #1197
  • Bartley, #1222
  • Carleton, #1235
  • Dennie, #1236
  • Gorge, #1269
  • Jere, #1271
  • Darold, #1279
  • Jodi, #1283
  • Butch, #1295
  • Darryll, #1316
  • Rayford, #1329
  • Daryll, #1336
  • Errick, #1340
  • Timonthy, #1348
  • Kary, #1361
  • Rodd, #1367
  • Shelly, #1369
  • Tige, #1370
  • Wendel, #1372
  • Corby, #1375
  • Earle, #1378
  • Gerold, #1379
  • Kreg, #1384
  • Rolf, #1389
  • Burl, #1396
  • Darran, #1398
  • Jami, #1405
  • Mel, #1410
  • Dorsey, #1423
  • Patrice, #1432
  • Alford, #1439
  • Cleve, #1443
  • Darryle, #1469
  • Johathan, #1478
  • Lynwood, #1482
  • Terri, #1488
  • Winfield, #1491
  • Connie, #1496

I'm actually surprised at how many are misspellings or respellings. Most of those were from the trendy names of the time, though. Quite a few at-the-time unisex nicknames or full names, as well, which the boys mostly "lost".
Also, who was still naming their kid Adolph in 1970?!?!

Girls:
  • Tammi, #318
  • Deanne, #393
  • Susanne, #408
  • Gayle, #418
  • Shonda, #432
  • Tonja, #464
  • Latanya, #473
  • Deann, #494
  • Terrie, #495
  • Lauri, #502
  • Lesa, #540
  • Lawanda, #542
  • Nanette, #548
  • Pam, #561
  • Shelli, #567
  • Dee, #572
  • Felecia, #572
  • Tamela, #577
  • Latonia, #583
  • Tamatha, #599
  • Misti, #602
  • Shanon, #609
  • Shannan, #612
  • Vonda, #612
  • Buffy, #614
  • Shanda, #621
  • Aretha, #640
  • Chanda, #652
  • Tawnya, #654
  • Letitia, #656
  • Vikki, #657
  • Trena, #673
  • Janene, #684
  • Tawana, #685
  • Gayla, #689
  • Lorri, #692
  • Latricia, #702
  • Shiela, #713
  • Sheree, #723
  • Renita, #724
  • Cindi, #728
  • Barbra, #738
  • Pamala, #740
  • Kathie, #745
  • Mellissa, #762
  • Shonna, #782
  • Yolonda, #787
  • Lucretia, #790
  • Tresa, #801
  • Kathi, #806
  • Dale, #813
  • Kecia, #814
  • Toya, #823
  • Willie, #824
  • Patrica, #836
  • Dedra, #838
  • Laverne, #839
  • Carie, #855
  • Milissa, #857
  • Cary, #864
  • Tangela, #872
  • Tanja, #876
  • Dona, #879
  • Carri, #892
  • Bobby, #895
  • Lorinda, #898
  • Sharonda, #904
  • Tena, #905
  • Tawanda, #908
  • Tisa, #911
  • Gerri, #916
  • Deloris, #921
  • Diann, #942
  • Mindi, #945
  • Sherie, #946
  • Tawanna, #951
  • Leisa, #954
  • Tamiko, #959
  • Cristi, #961
  • Shawnda, #969
  • Tosha, #970
  • Deedee, #975
  • Tracee, #978
  • Dyan, #980
  • Gale, #980
  • Kimberely, #990
  • Treena, #995
  • Towanda, #1005
  • Mellisa, #1007
  • Tamala, #1009
  • Lashon, #1011
  • Dawne, #1015
  • Gay, #1016
  • Deeann, #1028
  • Tameka, #1032
  • Dorene, #1034
  • Nannette, #1038
  • Tamie, #1040
  • Tarsha, #1041
  • Shawnna, #1051
  • Jerry, #1056
  • Migdalia, #1058
  • Trudi, #1059
  • Nichol, #1064
  • Terese, #1066
  • Marva, #1076
  • Melissia, #1079
  • Lavonda, #1082
  • Cinnamon, #1083
  • Stephaine, #1087
  • Donita, #1089
  • Detra, #1099
  • Joellen, #1101
  • Cherri, #1108
  • Larhonda, #1112
  • Nanci, #1115
  • Roxane, #1116
  • Ronna, #1122
  • Marty, #1130
  • Shalonda, #1131
  • Sharyn, #1132
  • Teena, #1141
  • Jacki, #1148
  • Shandra, #1152
  • Tammara, #1153
  • Romona, #1161
  • Shanta, #1163
  • Vickey, #1166
  • Carletta, #1176
  • Keshia, #1178
  • Devona, #1181
  • Latrina, #1185
  • Alfreda, #1191
  • Jammie, #1197
  • Laronda, #1199
  • Melba, #1204
  • Becki, #1213
  • Buffie, #1214
  • Felisa, #1217
  • Fonda, #1218
  • Gidget, #1219
  • Bernadine, #1224
  • Deedra, #1226
  • Lasonya, #1232
  • Sherita, #1237
  • Cherrie, #1239
  • Kelle, #1242
  • Lesia, #1244
  • Bonny, #1246
  • Shena, #1256
  • Tabetha, #1257
  • Wendie, #1259
  • Jeanene, #1264
  • Nilda, #1283
  • Petrina, #1284
  • Juliane, #1287
  • Tomeka, #1291
  • Lashanda, #1296
  • Sanjuanita, #1303
  • Suzann, #1304
  • Charise, #1306
  • Deneen, #1307
  • Chiquita, #1314
  • Rachele, #1326
  • Twana, #1328
  • Candance, #1330
  • Candie, #1330
  • Dannette, #1332
  • Dodie, #1333
  • Kellye, #1344
  • Taunya, #1351
  • Tony, #1352
  • Chantell, #1356
  • Jenniffer, #1361
  • Merri, #1364
  • Twanda, #1368
  • Ladawn, #1375
  • Lashunda, #1376
  • Nedra, #1381
  • Pattie, #1382
  • Tarra, #1386
  • Vernita, #1387
  • Denita, #1392
  • Inger, #1393
  • Karon, #1396
  • Patrina, #1403
  • Shaunda, #1419
  • Trinette, #1420
  • Billy, #1422
  • Lory, #1426
  • Steffanie, #1427
  • Calandra, #1430
  • Chanin, #1433
  • Cher, #1434
  • Coreen, #1436
  • Necole, #1441
  • Germaine, #1446
  • Latina, #1448
  • Nickie, #1450
  • Sherron, #1451
  • Cheryle, #1454
  • Latosha, #1457
  • Shondra, #1462
  • Carolee, #1464
  • Debbra, #1465
  • Sharee, #1469
  • Tari, #1471
  • Tonda, #1472
  • Anglea, #1475
  • Demetrice, #1477
  • Heide, #1480
  • Joe, #1481
  • Kiesha, #1491
  • Lavette, #1492
  • Omayra, #1495
  • Tiffiny, #1499
  • Treasa, #1500
A) It is crazy how many more girls' names there are. 
B) I removed a lot more girls' names from the boys' list than boys' names from the girls' list--only excluding long-standing traditional masculine names like Richard and Steven--since girls getting trendy boys' names or boys' diminutives is a thing that has always happened and they seemed more likely to be accurate data.

So wow! Again, lots of miss- and re-spellings of the popular names of the day. I'm sad to say a lot of these bring up unpleasant stereotypes. -_-

Migdalia intrigues me--Google brings up several Migdalias with Spanish surnames, and while I'm quite out-of-practice with Spanish, it seems to be a variant of Magdala (as in, the hometown of Mary Magdalene). Interesting!


Friday, February 17, 2017

Medieval World Tour--Ireland

It's probably pretty obvious by now that I love medieval English names, especially for girls. Well, I decided it's probably time to branch out, and am going to be looking at medieval names from other parts of the world, especially for names/forms that didn't survive to modern day.
First up: Irish!
(unless otherwise noted, the modernized Irish spelling is given)

Boys:
  • Ailill (AL-yill)--prob. "elf, sprite"
  • Ainníleas (AWN-eel-yas)--poss. "adopted child". Older form is Aindiles (AWN-dyil-yes). 
  • Anluan (AHN-loon)--poss. "great warrior" or "great hound". Modern surname form is Hanlon / O'Hanlon.
  • Ardán (AR-dawn)--"bear". Older form is Artán (AR-tawn). 
  • Baisceann (BAWSK-yan)--poss. "red head" or "round head"
  • Beollán (BYOHL-awn)--poss. "lively"
  • Branagán (BRAHN-ah-gawn)--"little raven". Modern surname form is Branigan/Brannigan.
  • Caithnia (KAWN-yee-ah)--"battle champion"
  • Céadach (KYAD-ahkh)--poss. "first". Anglicized as Kedagh
  • Ceallachán (KYAL-akh-awn)--prob. "little bright-head". Modern surname form is Callaghan/Callahan
  • Ceat (kyat)--"enduring, ancient". Older form is Cett (kyet).
  • Ceithernach--(KAY-her-nahkh)--"leader of warriors"
  • Ciarmhac (KYAR-vahk)--"dark son"
  • Ciothruadh (KYEER-oo-ah)--"red shower" or poss. "red passion"
  • Criofan / Criomthann (KREE-fan)--"fox"
  • Daighre (DIRE-yeh)--"flame"
  • Dalbhach (DAHL-vahkh)--poss. "guileful"
  • Éireamhón (AYR-yav-ohn)--origin unknown. Anglicized as Erevan or Erivan
  • Éimhín (AY-veen)--poss. "ready". Older form is Émíne (AY-veen-yeh).
  • Eochai / Eochaidh (OH-khee)--"horse". Older spelling is Eochaid
  • Eocho (OH-khoh)--form of Eochai. Older form is Eochu (OH-khoo). 
  • Fítheal (FEE-hyal)--poss. "goblin, sprite"
  • Flaitheamh (FLAH-hav)--"lord".
  • Flaithrí (FLAH-ree)--prob. "warrior king" or "lord-king"
  • Gaoithín (GAY-heen)--"little clever one". Older form is Gáethíne (GAY-heen-yeh). 
  • Guaire (GOOer-yeh)--"proud, noble"
  • Irial (EER-ee-ahl)--origin unknown
  • Laighneach (LYE-nakh)--"from Leinster". Older spelling is Laighnech
  • Lughaidh (LOO-ee)--from the god-name Lugh, "light"
  • Marcán (MAR-kawn)--"steed"
  • Muirgheas (MOOR ['oo' like in English "foot"]-yas)--"sea-strength"
  • Ríoghbhardán (RYEER-dawn)--"royal poet". Modern surname form is O'Riordan / Riordan.
  • Solamh (SOHL-av, SUL-av)--form of Hebrew Solomon, "peace".
  • Taichleach (TAHL-yakh)--"pacifying". Older spelling is Taithlech
  • Tuathal (TOO-ah-hahl)--"ruler of the people". Modern surname form is O'Toole.

Girls:
  • Abhlach (AHV-lahkh)--poss. "apple tree"
  • Ailleann (AWL-yan)--poss. "elf"
  • Aodhamair (AY-ah-meer)--"fire" [a feminine of Aidan/Aodhán]
  • Barrdhubh (BAR-oov)--"dark-headed"
  • Bébháil (BYAY-vahl)--poss. "lady of Ireland"
  • Béibhinn (BAY-vin)--"fair lady"
  • Caointiarn (KWEEN-tee-arn, KEEN-tee-arn)--"gentle lady"
  • Cobhlaith (KAHV-lah)--prob. "victorious"
  • Dianaimh (DYAN-iv)--"flawless"
  • Duibheasa (div-AS-ah)--"dark waterfall". Older form is Dub Essa (doov es-sah).
  • Dúinseach (DOON-shakh)--"fortress" or poss. "brown-haired girl"
  • Dunlaith (DOON-lah)--prob. "fortress-lady"
  • Eachra / Eachradh (AKH-rah)--prob. "horse". Other form is Echrad (EKH-rahth ['th' like "that"]).
  • Fíneamhain (FEEN-awn)--"vineyard"
  • Finneacht (FYIN-akht)--"fair" [a feminine of Finn]
  • Fíona (FEE-nah)--"vine". Older form is Fíne (FEEN-yeh).
  • Forlaith (FUR-lah, FOR-lah)--"sovereignty"
  • Gearrog (GYAR-rog)--"short"
  • Geiléis (GYEL-aysh)--prob. "bright swan"
  • Gormlaith (GORM-lah)--"blue lady" or poss. "splendid lady"
  • Lasair (LAH-seer)--"flame"
  • Learbhean (LYAR-van)--poss. "lady of the sea"
  • Líoghach (LEE-yahkh)--"beautiful"
  • Mór (MOHR)--"great, tall"
  • Muireann (MOOR ['oo' like English "foot"]-yan)--prob. "fair-sea". Older spelling is Muirenn
  • Muirgheal (MOOR ['oo' like English "foot"]-yal)--"sea-bright". 
  • Onóra (oh-NOR-ah)--form of Latin Honora, "honor"
  • Raghnailt (RYE-nilt)--from Norse Ragnhild, "battle-counsel"
  • Róinseach (ROHN-shakh)--"seal" [a feminine of Ronan]
  • Rónait (ROH-nat)--"seal" [another feminine of Ronan]
  • Saorla / Saorlaith (SAYR-lah)--prob. "noble princess". Older spelling is Sáerlaith
  • Séadach (SHAY-dahkh)--prob. "rich possessions"
  • Tailte (TAHL-tyeh)--poss. "earth" or "beautiful"
  • Tuathla / Tuathlaith (TOO-ah-lah)--"princess of the people"
  • Uasal (OO-sahl)--"noble"

Unisex:
  • Bairrfhionn (BAHR-ee-ahn)--"fair-headed"
  • Beag (BYAG)--"small". Older form is Becc ("BEK"). 
  • Caisin (KAHSH-een)--prob. "curly"
  • Ceallach (KYAHL-ahkh)--prob. "bright head" [much more common for boys]. Modern surname form is Kelly / O'Kelly.
  • Conna (KUN-nah, KAHN-nah)--prob. form of Latin Columba, "dove"
  • Éireannach (AY-ren-ahkh)--"of the Iverni/Erainn" [early Irish tribe]. Older spelling is Érennach
  • Uaithne (OO-in-yeh)--"green"

I know, I know--where are all the girls' names? The reason there are much fewer is two-fold:
Firstly, feminine names were much less likely to appear in records and writings; and secondly, girls were given English or Norse names more often than boys, especially the closer you get to modern-day, and many of those are still around today!

Because girls' names were harder to find, I ended up with a greater time-range than for boys--the boys' names are mostly late Medieval period (1100-1500), while some of the girls' names come from as early as the 600s. 

Monday, February 6, 2017

All Aboutt -tt.

Whaaaat? Two boys' lists in a row? How did that happen?

While perusing my name data, I noticed something interesting regarding final-t sounding names. Boys of course have more than girls (like with pretty much every consonant), but in the girls' case, they're split pretty evenly between __tte and ___t (with the former often being an alternate form of the latter). Boys have almost no ___tte names (as you probably could have guessed); rather, most of their names are ___tt, unrelated to any of the ___t names (although Elliott/Eliott/Eliot is a big exception!).
The difference comes in that the vast majority of ____tt names are English surnames, while ____t names are more mixed.

Because most are surnames, ____tt names for boys are a pretty modern-sounding group. The only ones fitting this pattern that really enjoyed popularity before now were Scott (peaked in the 60s), Brett (peaked in the 70s), and Garrett (peaked in the 90s).
Now of course, we have Wyatt, Everett, Emmett, Bennett, Elliott, Beckett, Garrett, Rhett, Barrett, Jett, and still Scott, just in the Top 500.

Any other worthy surnames we can find? ;)

  • Alcott--prob. from Old English "old cottage". Another form is Elcott
  • Arnott--prob. patronymic from Arnold, "eagle power". Also spelled Arnett or Arnatt
  • Avett--poss. patronymic from Alf-names "elf", or matronymic from Avis. Also spelled Avitt
  • Aylett--matronymic from Ailith, "noble battle". Also spelled Aylott
  • Bellett--matronymic from Isabel. Also spelled Bellott
  • Brevitt--prob. from "brevet". Another form is Breffitt
  • Bryett--poss. from French bruyant, "noisy". Also spelled Bryatt
  • Burchett--prob. patronymic from Burchard, "strong fortress", or poss. from "birch". Also spelled Birchett. Another form is Burkett
  • Burrett--poss. patronymic from Bertred, "bright counsel", Berred, "bear-counsel", Burgred, "fortress-counsel"; or similar Bert/Ber/Burg names. 
  • Carlett--prob. patronymic from Charles/Carl, "freeman"
  • Connett--prob. patro/matronymic from Constant/Constance
  • Corbett--from French "little raven". Also spelled Corbitt
  • Corlett--from Irish patronymic MacCorlett, from Norse Thorljotr, prob. "bright Thor"
  • Corrett--poss. from one of English places named Curry (those poss. from OE "mill" or Celtic "boundary"), or a form of Corey
  • Dennett--patro/matronymic from Dennis/Denise
  • Derrett--prob. patronymic from Derek/Theodoric, "people's ruler". Also spelled Derritt
  • Devitt--prob. from Irish patronymic of David. Another form is Davitt
  • Drewett--patro/matronymic from Drogo/Drueta, prob. "phantom". Also spelled Drewitt or Druett
  • Dyett--matronymic from Denise. Also spelled Dyott.
  • Edmett--prob. patronymic from Edmund, "wealthy protector", or Edmer, "wealthy-famous"
  • Ellett--matronymic from Ellen/Helen
  • Evenett--poss. from Welsh Ednyfed, etymology unknown; or matronymic from Eva. Also spelled Evennett
  • Evett--matronymic from Eva. Also spelled Evitt or Evatt
  • Garnett--patronymic from Guarin/Warin, "guard", or occupational name for a hinge-maker
  • Gillett--patronymic from Giles or matronymic from Gillian. Also spelled Jillett, Gillitt, or Gillatt. Another form is Gilliatt/Gilliett/Gilliott
  • Gwinnett--prob. from the area Gwynedd in Wales, or a matronymic from a Gwen/Gwyn- name.
  • Hallett--prob. from Old English "hall", or patronymic from Alard/Adelard, "noble strength". Also spelled Hallatt. Another form is Allett/Allatt
  • Hawkett--prob. occupational name for a falconer
  • Hewett--prob. patronymic from Hugh. Also spelled Hewitt, Huitt, or Huett
  • Hyatt--prob. from Old English "high gate" or "high road". Also spelled Hiett, HiattHyett, or Highett.
  • Ivatt--patro/matronymic from Ivo/Iva, "yew". Also spelled Ivett
  • Jarrett--patronymic from Gar/Ger-names, "spear". Also spelled Jerrett, Jarrott, or Jarratt
  • Jemmett--patronymic from James 
  • Jennett--matronymic from Jane
  • Jessett--prob. patronymic from Joseph
  • Jewett--patro/matronymic from Julian [unisex, but more common for girls, in medieval England]. Also spelled Jewitt or Juett. Another form is Jowett/Jowitt
  • Kellett--prob. from Old Norse kelda, "spring, well". Also spelled Kellitt
  • Kennett--from one of the rivers Kennet or Kennett in England, origin unknown. Another form is Kinnett/Kynett
  • Kimmitt--patro/matronymic from Cyn-names, "royal". Also spelled Kimmett. Another form is Kemmett
  • Kinzett--poss. from Old English "royal residence". Another form is Kensett
  • Larrett--patronymic from Laurence. Also spelled Larratt or Larritt
  • Levett--prob. from French "wolf cub" or "yew grove"; or patro/matronymic from Lef-names, "beloved". Also spelled LevittLeavitt, or Leavett
  • Mabbott--matronymic from Mabel/Amabel. Also spelled Mabbett, Mabbatt, Mabbutt, or Mabbitt
  • Marriott--prob. from Old English "boundary gate", or matronymic from Mary. Also spelled Merriott. Another form is Merrett/Merritt/Marratt/Marrett/Marritt/Marrott
  • Millott--prob. patronymic from Miles, or occupational name for millet farmer. Also spelled Millett or Millatt
  • Morritt--patronymic from Maurice/Morris. Also spelled Morrett
  • Myatt--patronymic from Michael. Also spelled Miatt or Myott
  • Ollett--prob. matronymic from Olive or patronymic from Oliver
  • Orrett--poss. patronymic from Wulfred, "wolf counsel", or Wulfric, "wolf ruler", or similar. Also spelled Orritt
  • Pagett--occupational name for, or patronymic from, a page. Also spelled Padgett
  • Phillott--patronymic from Philip
  • Pollett--prob. patronymic from Paul, or from an English place called Pawlett ("pole stream"). Also spelled Pollitt or Pawlett
  • Prescott--from Old English "priest cottage". Other forms include Preskett and Priscott
  • Prevett--from Old English "copse". Other forms include Privett and Previtt
  • Prewett --prob. from French preu, "brave". Also spelled Prewitt, Pruitt, or Pruett
  • Quinett--prob. from French patronymic of Jacques/Jacob, or poss. matronymic from English Quin/Quen-name, "queen". 
  • Revett--prob. from "rivet". Also spelled Revitt. Another form is Rivett/Rivitt
  • Rylett--poss. from one of many Ry- place names, "rye", or a patronymic from Roland or Rolf. Also spelled Rylatt, Rilett, or Rilatt
  • Sharrott--from one of many Sher/Shir- place-names, "bright". Also spelled Sherrett, Sherritt, Sharrett, Sharratt, or Sherratt
  • Sinnett--poss. patronymic from Sigenod, "victory-desire", or another similar Sigi-name. Also spelled Sinnott, SinnattSynnott, or Synnett. Another form is Sennott/Sennett
  • Stennett--patronymic from Old English/Norse Stan/Sten-names, "stone". Another form is Stannett/Stanett
  • Tamsett--prob. patronymic from Thomas. Also spelled Tamsitt
  • Trevett--prob. from Cornish Tre- place-names, "farm". Also spelled Trevitt
  • Tillett--matronymic from Matilda. Also spelled Tillott or Tillitt
  • Tollett--prob. patronymic from Thorleifr, "Thor-heir", or Thorleikr, "Thor-battle"; or poss. matronymic from Matilda. Also spelled Tollitt
  • Trewitt--prob. from Old English Tre- or Tru- place-names, "tree", "brush". Also spelled Truett, Truitt, Trewhitt, or Trewett
  • Tullett--prob. occupational name for a tile-maker or armorer. Also spelled Tulett
  • Werrett--prob. patronymic from Guarin/Warin, "guard". Also spelled Wherritt
  • Wescott--from Old English "west cottage". 
  • Wilcott--prob. Old English "streamside cottage"
  • Willett--patronymic from Will-names, "will". Also spelled Willatt or Willott
  • Wilmott--patronymic from William. Also spelled Willmott. Other forms include Willimott and Wilmett/Willmett
  • Winnett--patronymic from Welsh Wyn, "white, blessed", or Old English Wine, "friend". 
  • Winscott--from Old English "Wine's cottage". Another form is Wincott
  • Winslett--from Old English "Wine's spring"
  • Witt--patronymic from Witta, "white". Also spelled Whitt