Friday, January 29, 2016

Biblically Unisex

It can't be, right? Unisex names are a modern thing!
Well, no; not really. While using male/"unisex" names on girls is a pretty trendy thing in the US right now, there have always been unisex names.
I do think that many [rarer] Biblical names should be up for grabs for both genders anyway--after all, who's to say they weren't used on girls in Biblical times? Most aren't etymologically gendered, and there are at least 10x more men named in the Bible than women....but I digress.
If you'd rather stick to unisex names there's precedent for, that's pretty understandable. ;)
  • Abihail "my father is might"
  • Abijah, Abiah "my father is Yahweh"
  • Ahlai "wishful"
  • Anah "answer"
  • Athaliah, Athlai "Yahweh binds"
  • Ephah "darkness"
  • Gomer "completion"
  • Hodiah "majesty of Yahweh"
  • Hushim "hastening"
  • Maacah, Maachah "depression [of the ground]"
  • Mehetabel "God makes glad"
  • Micaiah, Michaiah "who is like Yahweh?"
  • Noadiah "meeting with Yahweh"
  • Noah "movement" (fem), "rest" (masc)
    [usually spelled Noa when used on girls in the US today, but in the English Bible, both are Noah. The masculine name would really be more faithfully transliterated as Noach]
  • Oholibamah "tent in the high place"
  • Puah "glitter" (fem), "strike to pieces" (masc)
  • Shelomith "peaceable"
  • Shua "wealth" (fem), "cry for help" (masc)
  • Timna "restraint"

I also found another interesting set of names--Biblically used for both people and locations. When they have caught on in modern times, Biblical place names tend toward feminine (e.g. Bethany, Beulah, Moriah, Belén, Shiloh), but interestingly, most of these are masculine names.
Of course, many may be artifacts of transliteration, or places named for people. ;)
(I came across most of these by accident; it's probably nowhere near a complete list!)
  • Alemeth, Alameth "covering"
  • Anathoth "answers"
  • Ariel "lion of God"
    [masculine on people, but the symbolic name for Jerusalem, which is personified as feminine]
  • Azel "noble"
  • Bilhah "timid" [feminine]
  • Dedan--unknown meaning
  • Eden "delight" [yes, a masculine name in the Bible!]
  • Eder "flock"
  • Ephrath, Ephrathah "fruitful" [feminine]
  • Eshcol "cluster [like of grapes]"
  • Gilead "memorial cairn"
  • Haran "scorched"
  • Havilah poss. "circular" or "sand"
  • Hebron "association"
  • Hezron "court"
  • Jabesh "dry"
  • Japhia "shining"
  • Naamah "pleasantness" [feminine]
  • Naarah, Naarath "maiden" [feminine]
  • Ophir--unknown meaning
  • Ophrah "fawn"
  • Penuel "face of God"
  • Rehob "wide space" [not to be confused with feminine name Rahab]
  • Rekem "many-colored"
  • Rimmon, Remmon "pomegranate"
  • Sheba--meaning unknown
  • Teman "south"
  • Tirzah "delightful" [feminine]

Saturday, January 23, 2016

Chloe, Zoe, Penelope, Phoebe, Daphne, Ariadne......

Is it just me, or are Greek-origin "-ee" names for girls having a good time in the US right now? The titular names are all in the US Top 1000--Zoe & Chloe are #s 32 & 18 respectively (8 & 13 if you go by NameNerds), Penelope has had an amazing rise over the last decade, Phoebe & Daphne have been slowly creeping up, and Ariadne is now in the Top 1000. And while they don't rank yet, I wouldn't be surprised to see Calliope and/or Persephone join them soon.
Think we can find some more? I do too! ;)
(note: I'm mostly listing the "traditional" English pronunciations [Erasmian, for you fellow nerds], which really don't necessarily match the Greek at all.)

  • Agathe (AG-ah-thee)--original form of Agatha, "good"
  • Agaue (ah-GOW-ee)--"noble"
  • Aikaterine (eye-kah-tah-REE-nee)--original form of Katherine
  • Aithre (EYE-three)--"clear sky"
  • Alexiroe (al-eks-EER-oh-ee)
  • Alkimede (al-KIM-ed-ee)--"mighty cunning". Latinized form is Alcimede (al-SIM-ed-ee). 
  • Alkinoe (al-KIN-oh-ee)--"strong mind". Latinized form is Alcinoe (al-SIN-oh-ee). 
  • Alkyone (al-KYE-on-ee)--"kingfisher" [a bird]. Latinized form is Alcyone (al-SYE-on-ee).  
  • Anchiroe (an-KEER-oh-ee)
  • Andromache (an-DROM-ah-kee)
  • Anthe (AN-thee)--"bloom"
  • Antigone (an-TIG-on-ee)
  • Anyte (an-EYE-tee)
  • Aoide (ay-EE-dee)--"song"
  • Arachne (ah-RAK-nee)--"spider" [probably could have guessed that one, right?]
  • Ariadne (ar-ee-AHD-nee, ehr-ee-AD-nee)--"most holy"
  • Arke (AR-kee)--"swift". Latinized form is Arce (AHR-see). 
  • Arsinoe (ar-SIN-oh-ee)--"lifting the mind"
  • Atalante (at-ah-LAN-tee)
  • Athene (ah-THEE-nee)--form of Athena
  • Berenice (behr-en-EE-see)--"bringing victory" [Latinized]
  • Beroe (BEHR-oh-ee)
  • Caliadne (kal-ee-AD-nee)--"beautiful and holy"
  • Calliope (kah-LYE-oh-pee)--"beautiful voice"
  • Callirhoe (kal-EER-oh-ee)--"beautiful stream"
  • Calliste (kah-LIST-ee)--"most beautiful"
  • Carme (KAR-mee)
  • Chelone (kel-OH-nee)--"tortoise"
  • Chione (KYE-on-ee)--"snow"
  • Chloe (KLOH-ee)--"green shoot"
  • Chrysanthe (kris-AN-thee)--"golden flower"
  • Cleone (klee-OH-nee)--prob. "glory"
  • Danaë (DAN-ah-ee)
  • Daphne (DAF-nee)--"laurel"
  • Dione (DYE-oh-nee, dee-OH-nee)--"of Zeus"
  • Eione (AY-oh-nee, ay-OH-nee)
  • Eirene (ay-REE-nee)--original form of Irene, "peace"
  • Elete (EL-et-ee)
  • Enarete (en-AR-et-ee)
  • Euadne (yoo-AD-nee)--"very holy". Latinized form is Evadne (eh-VAD-nee, eh-VAHD-nee).
  • Euanthe (yoo-AN-thee)--"good flower". Latinized form is Evanthe (eh-VAN-thee).
  • Euarne (yoo-AR-nee)--poss. "good lamb". Latinized form is Evarne (eh-VAR-nee). 
  • Eudore (yoo-DOHR-ee)--"good gift"
  • Eulimene (yoo-LIM-en-ee)--"good harbor"
  • Eunoe (yoo-NOH-ee)--"good mind"
  • Eupheme (yoo-FEE-mee)--"good speaking"
  • Euphrosyne (yoo-FROS-in-ee)--"mirth"
  • Gaiane (GYE-an-ee)--"of Gaia"
  • Galene (gah-LEE-nee)--"calm"
  • Glauke (GLOW-kee)--"blue-grey".
  • Helene (hel-EN-ee)--original form of Helen. Modern Greek form is Elene (el-EH-nee).
  • Hermione (her-MYE-oh-nee)--"of Hermes"
  • Herse (HER-see)--"dew"
  • Hesione (hes-EYE-on-ee)--"forethought"
  • Hyale (HYE-ah-lee)--"crystal"
  • Ianthe (eye-AN-thee)--"violet flower"
  • Iole (EYE-oh-lee, eye-OH-lee)--"violet"
  • Ione (EYE-oh-nee, eye-OH-nee)--"violet flower"
  • Ismene (is-MEE-nee)--"knowledge"
  • Kallistrate (kah-LIS-trah-tee, kal-is-TRAH-tee)
  • Kleide (KLAY-dee)
  • Kore (KOHR-ee)--"maiden"
  • Kyane (KYE-an-ee)--"cyan". Latinized form is Cyane (SYE-an-ee). 
  • Kyrene (kye-REE-nee)--poss. "lordly". Latinized form is Cyrene (sye-REE-nee).
  • Kyriake (keer-ee-ah-KEE)
  • Liriope (leer-EYE-op-ee)--"narcissus flower". Another form is Leiriope (lay-RYE-op-ee). 
  • Lysistrate (lis-IS-trah-tee, lis-is-TRAH-tee)
  • Magdalene (mag-dah-LEE-nee)
  • Melaine (mel-EYE-nee)--original form of Melanie, "black". 
  • Melete (MEL-eh-tee)
  • Melinoe (mel-IN-oh-ee)--prob. "dark mind" or "reconciling mind". Another form is Meilinoe (may-LIN-oh-ee).
  • Melite (MEL-it-ee)--"honey"
  • Merope (MEHR-op-ee)
  • Minthe (MIN-thee)--"mint"
  • Mneme (NEE-mee)--"memory"
  • Myrrine (meer-EE-nee)--"myrrh"
  • Myrsine (meer-SEE-nee)--poss. "myrrh"
  • Nakole (nah-KOH-lee)
  • Nephele (NEF-eh-lee)--"cloud"
  • Nesaie (nes-EYE-ee)--"island"
  • Nike (NYE-kee)--"victory"
  • Niobe (nye-OH-bee, NYE-ob-ee)
  • Oenone (en-OH-nee, ee-NOH-nee)
  • Pallene (pal-EE-nee)
  • Parthenope (par-THEN-op-ee)
  • Penelope (pen-EL-op-ee)
  • Persephone (pur-SEF-on-ee)
  • Phaisyle (FYE-sil-ee)--"shining". Latinized form is Phaesyle (FEE-sil-ee). 
  • Pheme (FEE-mee)--"fame, rumour"
  • Phile (FYE-lee)--"beloved"
  • Philonoe (fil-ON-oh-ee)--"loving mind" or "beloved mind"
  • Philyre (FIL-er-ee)--"linden tree"
  • Phoebe (FEE-bee)--"bright" [Latinized]
  • Photine (foh-TEE-nee)--"light"
  • Phryne (FRYE-nee)
  • Psamathe (SAM-ah-thee)--"sand goddess"
  • Rhene (REE-nee)
  • Roxane (rohks-AH-nee)--form of Roxanne, "dawn"
  • Salome (sah-LOH-mee)
  • Sappheire (saf-AY-ree)--"sapphire"
  • Selene (sel-EE-nee)--"moon"
  • Semele (SEM-el-ee)
  • Sinoe (SIN-oh-ee)--poss. "mischievous"
  • Sophrosyne (soh-FROS-in-ee)--"self-control"
  • Sose (SOH-see)--"safe"
  • Tereine (ter-AY-nee)--"piercing"
  • Thelxinoe (thelks-IN-oh-ee)--"enchanting mind"
  • Theone (thee-OH-nee)--"of god"
  • Theonoe (thee-ON-oh-ee)--"intelligent goddess"
  • Thisbe (THIS-bee)
  • Thoe (THOH-ee)--"swift"
  • Tyche (TYE-kee)--"luck"
  • Xanthe (ZAN-thee)
  • Xanthippe (zan-THIP-ee)
  • Xene (ZEN-ee)
  • Zoe (ZOH-ee)--"life"
  • Zosime (ZOH-sim-ee)


As usual, this is nowhere near an extensive list! I narrowed to names that seemed usable in English, had interesting backstories or meanings, or were just fun to say.

Will I have a cat named Thelxinoe someday?
Probably. 

Tuesday, January 19, 2016

Non-er Occupationals

So a few days ago I compiled a list of -er names that weren't occupational surnames. But that got me to wondering about the reverse: English occupational surnames that don't end in -er/or. We've got Mason, BaileyClark, and um......surely there's tons of others, right?
This is mostly for fun, but I'm sure there are some that would make decent first names (or already are :) ).
(nowhere near an exhaustive list, of course!)

  • Abbey--abbey servant
  • Abbott--abbot, abbot's servant
  • Ackerman--tenant farmer
  • Bailey--bailiff
  • Beck--baker, miner [other derivations as well]
  • Bird/Byrd--falconer, dove-keeper
  • Bond--tenant farmer
  • Bowman--archer 
  • Chase--hunter
  • Clark/Clarke--clerk, scribe
  • Clay--clay-worker
  • Coleman--charcoal maker [other derivations as well]
  • Dean--dean, dean's employee
  • Denman--gravedigger
  • Gage--assayer, moneylender
  • Garnet/Garnett--pomegranate seller, hinge-maker
  • Hall/Hallman--manor servant
  • Haward/Hayward--land warden
  • Howard--shepherd [other derivations as well]
  • Jardine--gardener
  • Kay/Key--quay-worker [other derivations as well]
  • Kellogg--hog-butcher
  • Marchand--merchant
  • Marshall--officer, lawman
  • Martel--smith [other derivations as well]
  • Mason--stone-worker
  • Millard/Millward--mill guard
  • Norris--wet nurse [other derivations as well]
  • Paige/Page/Paget--page, servant
  • Palfrey--horse breeder or keeper
  • Provost--military or religious official
  • Reeve/Reeves/Revie--sheriff
  • Scarlett--dealer of escarlate cloth
  • Seward--swineherd [other derivations as well]
  • Shepherd/Shepard--shepherd
  • Sherman--shearer, barber
  • Smith/Smythe--smith
  • Spence--spencer, steward
  • Stewart/Steward/Stuart--steward
  • Stoddard--horse-keeper
  • Summers--court summoner
  • Ward--watchman, guard
  • Wayne--wagon maker, driver
  • Wright--craftsman
  • Yeoman--landowner

Thursday, January 14, 2016

Spam-a-Lot

My spam filter missed a couple the other day, including one from an "Ana". How do spammers pick their names, I wonder? Is it calculated, figuring names that you're likely to recognize and mistake for an acquaintance (which almost worked in this case)? Or is it just completely random? After going through my spam folder, I have to think it's more the latter...

  • Adrian (2)
  • Adriana
  • Alejandro
  • Alexandria
  • Allie
  • Ana
  • Anastasia
  • Angelique
  • Bertha
  • Bianca
  • Blanche
  • Bobbi
  • Carolann
  • Cate
  • Cecille
  • Charmaine
  • Chris (at least 3 separate scams! Maybe there is some sort of method...)
  • Christine
  • Dave
  • Davison
  • Gertrude
  • Hyacinth
  • Jennie
  • Jennifer
  • Jennine
  • Jess
  • Jimmie
  • Julianne
  • Karina
  • Kenia
  • Keri
  • Kuri
  • Linda
  • Lisbeth
  • Lola
  • Lorene
  • Magnolia
  • Margarita
  • Margo
  • Maria
  • Marietta
  • Marisha
  • Michael
  • Natalia
  • Nicki
  • Olivia
  • Paige
  • Shakira
  • Shawna
  • Sonya
  • Stephanie
  • Susan
  • Sylvia

Monday, January 11, 2016

Non-Occupationals

Occupational surnames are a big trend right now (Mason, Carter, Taylor, Harper, Piper, Hunter, Chase)--and the vast majority end in -er.
I admit, though; I have a bit of a hang-up on occupational surnames; they just seem too....literal? But, there are lots of nice names, for both genders, that can fit the -er trend without being occupational surnames. :)
(I already did a post on Greek-origin -ander names here, which would easily double the boys' list!)

Boys:
  • Abner (AB-ner, English)--from [Biblical] Hebrew, "my father is light". Other forms include Avner (Hebrew) and Abenner ([Biblical] Greek).
  • Adler (AD-ler, English)--from German, "eagle"
  • Alder (AHL-der, English)
  • Alger (AL-jer, English)
  • Alister (AL-is-ter, Scotish)--form of Alexander
  • Asger (AS-ger, Danish)
  • Asher (ASH-er, English, [Biblical] Hebrew)--"happy"
  • Astor (AS-ter, English; AS-tohr, Swedish)
  • Auster (AW-ster, OW-ster, Latin)--"south"
  • Birger (BEER-ger, BEER-yer, Scandinavian)
  • Christer (KRIS-ter, Scandinavian)--form of Christian. Also spelled Krister.
  • Conor (KAHN-or, Irish, Scottish, English)--also spelled Connor.
  • Dieter (DEE-ter, German)--form Germanic "people's warrior"
  • Ebenezer (eb-en-EE-zer, [Biblical] Hebrew)
  • Eimer (EYE-mehr, German)
  • Eliezer (el-ee-AY-zer, el-eye-EE-zer, [Biblical] Hebrew)--"God is my help"
  • Elmer (EL-mer, English)--from Germanic, "noble and famous"
  • Ezer (AY-zer, EE-zer, [Biblical] Hebrew)--"help"
  • Fraser (FRAY-zer, FRAY-zher, Scottish, English)--also spelled Frazier.
  • Greger (GREH-ger, Swedish)--form of Gregory
  • Gunther (GOON-ter, German)--also spelled Gunter
  • Haider (HYE-der, Arabic)--"lion". Also transliterated Haidar or Hyder.
  • Heber (HEE-ber, [Biblical] Hebrew)--"community"
  • Hector (HEK-tor, English, German, EK-tohr, Spanish, French)
  • Holger (HOHL-ger, German, Dutch, Scandinavian)
  • Homer (HOH-mer, English)--from [ancient] Greek, "pledge"
  • Jasper (JAS-per, English; YAHS-pehr, Dutch)--from Persian, "treasurer". Other forms include Casper (English, Dutch, Scandinavian), Kacper (Polish), and Jesper (Danish)
  • Lester (LES-ter, English)
  • Luther (LOO-ther, English)--from Germanic "people's army"
  • Melker (MEL-ker, Swedish)--form of Melchior
  • Mortimer (MOR-tim-er, English)
  • Oliver (OL-ih-ver, English, Danish, German, Scandinavian)
  • Peter (PEE-ter, English; PEH-ter, Dutch, German, Scandinavian)--other forms include Peder (Scandinavian) and Pieter (Dutch)
  • Prosper (PRAHS-per, English; prohs-PEHR, French)
  • Rainer (RYE-ner, German)--from Germanic "army advisor". Other forms include Rayner (English) and Reiner (German)
  • Roger (RAH-jer, English; ROH-ger, German, Scandinavian; roh-ZHAY, French)--from Germanic "famous spear". Other forms include Rüdiger (German) and Rutger (Dutch).
  • Silvester (sil-VES-ter, English, German)--also spelled Sylvester.
  • Tomer (TOH-mer, English; toh-MEHR, Hebrew)--from Hebrew "palm tree"
  • Topher (TOH-pher, English)--short form of Christopher
  • Trevor (TREV-er, English, Welsh)
  • Uther (OO-ther, Welsh [mythology])
  • Victor (VIK-ter, English; VEEK-tor, Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Romanian)
  • Walter (WAHL-ter, English; VAHL-ter, Dutch, Italian, German, Portuguese, Scandinavian)--other forms include Valter (Croatian, Estonian, Portuguese, Slovene, Scandinavian) and Walther (German), Wolter (Dutch), and Wouter (Dutch)
  • Werner (VEHR-ner, German, Dutch, Scandinavian; WEHR-ner, Dutch)--another form is Warner (English)
  • Wilmer (WIL-mer, English)--from Germanic "famous will"
  • Xavier (ex-AYV-ver, ZAYV-yer, English; shahv-YEHR, Portuguese; zav-YEHR, French)--other forms include Xaver (German).

Girls:
  • Amber (AM-ber, English)
  • Aster (AS-ter, English)
  • Clover (KLOH-ver, English)
  • Coriander (KOHR-ee-an-der, English)
  • Demeter (deh-MEE-ter, deh-MEH-ter, [ancient] Greek)--prob. "earth mother"
  • Ember (EM-ber, English)
  • Emer (EE-mer, AY-mer, Irish [mythology])--prob. "swift". Modern Irish form is Eimhear
  • Esther (ES-ter, English, German, Dutch; es-TEHR, Hebrew, French)--other forms include Ester (Danish, Czech, Portuguese, Spanish, Scandinavian), Eszter (Hungarian), and Hester ([Biblical] Latin)
  • Ginger (JIN-jer, English)
  • Gunver (GOON-ver, Danish, Swedish)
  • Gwener (GWEN-er, Welsh)--form of Venus [Dydd Gwener = Friday]
  • Heather (HETH-er ['th' like in the], English)
  • Honor (ON-er, English)
  • Imber (EEM-ber, Swedish)--form of Ingeborg
  • Inger (ING-er, Scandinavian)--form of Ingrid
  • Jennifer (JEN-if-er, Cornish, English, German; YEN-ee-fer, Spanish, Swedish)--also spelled Jenifer.
  • Juniper (JOON-ip-er, English)
  • Lavender (LAV-en-der, English)
  • Summer (SUM-mer, English)
  • Winter (WIN-ter, English)

Unisex:
  • Briar (BRYE-er, English)--also spelled Brier.
  • Gomer (GOH-mer, goh-MEHR, [Biblical] Hebrew)--"complete"
  • River (RIV-er, English)
  • Vesper (VES-per, English)--from Latin, "evening"

Wow. I was not prepared for how many English word-names there'd be, particularly for girls! I imagine they probably fit in better on other themed lists, but meh. They fit the pattern. ;)

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Seussical Naming

Is your name in a Dr. Suess book? There's a surprising (mostly highly rhyme-able) variety. :)

  • One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish: Ned, Mike, Joe, Ish, Clark
  • Hop on Pop: Jim, Red, Ned, Ted, Ed, Pat, Will
  • ABC: Annie, David Donald, Icabod, Jerry Jordan, Lola, Oscar, Peter, Rosy Robin, Sammy, Ubb, Vera Violet, Willy, Warren, Waldo, Nixie, Yolanda
  • Horton Hears a Who!: Horton, Vlad, Jo-Jo
  • Horton Hatches the Egg: Horton, Mayzie
  • The Sleep Book: Jo, Mo
  • The Cat in the Hat / The Cat in the Hat Comes Back: Sally
  • Fox in Socks: Sue, Joe, Bim, Ben, Luke
  • Green Eggs and Ham: Sam
  • The Tooth Book: Ruthie/Ruth, Donald Driscoll, Sam, Mike, Quincy, Simon, Pam, Jimbo, Hilda, Katy, Billy
  • Yertle the Turtle and other stories: Yertle, Mack; Gertrude, Lolla-Lee-Lou, Dake
  • And To Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street: Marco, Jack, Fred, Joe, Nat, Jane
  • McElligot's Pool: Marco
  • The 500 Hats of Bartholomew Cubbins: Bartholomew, Derwin, Alaric, Snipps, Nadd, Wilfred
  • Bartholomew and the Oobleck: Bartholomew, Derwin
  • How the Grinch Stole Christmas: Max, Cindy-Lou
  • The King's Stilts: Birtram, Droon, Eric
  • If I Ran the Zoo: Gerald
  • If I Ran the Circus: Morris
  • Thidwick the Big-Hearted Moose: Thidwick
  • On Beyond Zebra!: Conrad Cornelius
  • Did I Ever Tell You How Lucky You Are?: Herbie, Ali
  • Happy Birthday to You!: Pete, Polly, Paul, Nate, Nelly, Ned
  • The Sneetches and other stories: Sylvester, Dave
  • Scrambled Eggs Super!: Peter, Liz
  • I Had Trouble in Getting to Solla Sollew: Sam, Butch, Genghis Khan
  • I Can Lick 30 Tigers Today! and other stories: Looie
  • Marvin K. Mooney Will You Please Go Now!: Marvin
  • I Wish That I Had Duck Feet: Bill
  • What Pet Should I Get?: Kay
  • Oh Say Can You Say: Hooey, Bipper, Bud, Skipper, Jipper, Jeffery, Jud, Horatio, Horace, Hendrix, Hud, Dinwoodie, Dinty, Dud, Fitzsimmon, Fredrick, Fud, Slinky, Stinky, Stuart, Stud, Lud, Pete, Fritz, Fred, Dinn, Dwight
  • Daisy-Head Mayzie: Mayzie, Herman "Butch", Einstein, Gregory
  • The Bippolo Seed and other lost stories: Gustav, Tadd, Todd, Henry
  • Horton and the Kluggerwug and other lost stories: Horton, Marco, Pat

Saturday, January 2, 2016

Potential -ianas and -inas

We get lots of our modern names from Latin--no denying that! And many of them are obviously closely related--Lucia & Luciana, Paula & Paulina, Julia & Juliana, etc. While -ina is usually considered a diminutive nowadays, back then, it was a suffix of possession or origin, as was -iana. So, Luciana = "like/of Lucia/Lucius/light"; and Paulina = "like/of Paula/Paulus/a small thing".
We already have a lot of these pairs, but since -ana is a rather trendy ending right now, I though it'd be fun to see if there's any we've forgotten, or possibly have never been used.
(there doesn't seem to be a hard rule for when words/names get -iana and when they get -ina. Usually -ia names become -iana and anything else is -ina, but not always. There's also a third suffix, -ana, but that one's pretty uncommon.)

  • Aetiana, Aetina; from Aetius
  • Amabiliana, Amabilina; from Amabilia 
  • Amandina; from Amanda 
  • Amantina, Amantiana; from Amantis 
  • Amatina; from Amata 
  • Appiana; from Appius
  • Atiliana, Atilina; from Atilius
  • Aulina, Auliana; from Aulus
  • Aureana, Aurina; from Aurea 
  • Aurorina, Auroriana; from Aurora 
  • Aviliana, Avilina; from Avilia
  • Avitina; from Avitus
  • Beatina; from Beata
  • Caeciliana/Ceciliana; from Caecilia/Cecilia
  • Caeliana/Celiana; from Caelia/Celia
  • Camilliana, Camillina; from Camilla
  • Cardeana, Cardina; from Cardea 
  • Cassiana; from Cassius
  • Celsina; from Celsus
  • Clarina, Clariana; from Clara
  • Claudiana, Claudina; from Claudia
  • Cloelina, Cloeliana; from Cloelia
  • Concordina; from Concordia 
  • Corneliana; from Cornelia
  • Drusina; from Drusa
  • Drusilliana, Drusillina; from Drusilla
  • DuilianaDuilina; from Duilius
  • Egeriana; from Egeria
  • Eliciana; from Elicius
  • Eligiana, Eligina; from Eligius
  • Emerentina; from Emerentius
  • Fulviana; from Fulvia
  • Gallina, Galliana; from Gallus
  • Hilariana; from Hilaria
  • Janina/Ianina; from Janus/Ianus
  • Jovina/Iovina, Joviana/Ioviana; from Jove/Iovis
  • Juniana/Iuniana; from Junia/Iunia
  • Laeliana; from Laelia
  • Laurina, Lauriana; from Laura
  • Luciliana; from Lucilius
  • Marciana, Marcina; from Marcia
  • Maurina; from Maurus
  • Naeviana/Neviana, Naevina/Nevina; from Naevius/Nevio
  • Octaviana; from Octavia
  • Olivina; from Oliva
  • Patriciana; from Patricia
  • Priscina; from Prisca
  • Priscilliana, Priscillina; from Priscilla
  • Remigiana; from Remigius
  • Remina; from Remus
  • Sabelliana, Sabellina; from Sabellius
  • Silviana/Sylviana, Silvina/Sylvina; from Silvia/Sylvia
  • Tulliana; from Tullius
  • Ursina; from Ursa
  • Variana; from Varius
  • Victoriana; from Victoria
  • Vitina, Vitiana; from Vitus

If you want an -iana that's a bit less "out-there" but still uncommon, I did an earlier post here. :)